the-cringe-channel:

http://www.cringechannel.com

"Verily, this Vichyssoise of verbiage veers most verbose…"

the-cringe-channel:

http://www.cringechannel.com

"Verily, this Vichyssoise of verbiage veers most verbose…"

Just finished Bojack. Spoilers, maybe.

I’ll be a little harsh; yeah, it’s kind of a box-checking and second-season-teasing episode, but it still worked fine far as I’m concerned; still as properly heartfelt and gritty and goofy as the rest of the show, and it’s great to see Bojack sifting around in the spacious “What now?”. That’s the unique strength of this show, it’s all about the disquieting “What now?”s.

Well-done pin placed in Bojack and Diane’s relationship for now. Really touching moments during the “Wild Horses” montage (not just a pun! These guys can really nail licensed music usage), seeing Herb and his nurse stood out, especially.

Props to Will Arnett for nailing the Secretariat monologue. An actor playing an actor acting is complicated, and making “really good acting” a plot point is a really risky play, but Arnett dunked it. Nothing more needed to be said about Bojack playing that monologue so close to the chest.

The Secretariat bit was genius, I swear these guys make a gorgeous patchwork portrait of Bojack in these flashbacks. I feel like Al Manheim assembling his jigsaw puzzle picture of Sammy Glick.

It’s probably the most astute diagnosis of the ills of celebrity culture the show has made so far; this version of Secretariat, Bojack, those among us who are sucked into the cult of “success” and always trying to run to the top, don’t pick up the pace because they see the winner’s circle in sight. They run because they feel hunted. They strive for an ill-conceived “greatness” because they feel small and horrible “deep down”. They’re afraid they don’t have a “deep down”, because at some point, they had to learn the simplest defense mechanisms a wounded child can muster; avoidance, and playing pretend. They grow up in a desperate survivalist mindset, rather than developing the strength it takes to live and learn from sadness, but knowing only to mask or run from it.

That’s perhaps why Bojack is the only person who recognizes Vincent as a child pretending to be an adult; because he knows what that’s like from the inside-out. He’s wounded enough and self-aware enough to know another kid awkwardly stuffed into a grown-up’s position when he sees it.

Right, that got a little flowery. But whatever. Bring on Season 2 (next year, I assume). I was happy to hear that apparently there was such faith behind the show that the second season was greenlit far before the announcement (i.e. before the first season even aired). It’s in a totally different class, but I haven’t been this enthralled by a series protagonist since Rust from ‘True Detective’, and I love that Bojack fits the “gritty antihero” mold of a lot of TV protagonists these days, but is skewed far more vulnerably and realistically. Your Rustin Cohle’s can be self-indulgent unreal badasses, hardened by the knowledge that they’re damaged and can never be fixed. Bojack’s terrified by the thought, and rightfully so.

Here’s hoping he calls Charlotte.

I made this because I finished episode 11 of Bojack Horseman today, and it’s my fucking jam.Seems like half of my friend circle worked on in some capacity, and I really need to give this show a recommendation; and not just because half of my friend circle worked on it (or because they deftly dropped a Death Grips track in one episode). I really feel like the series hasn’t gotten a fair shake critically, with a pretty middling reception so far. Word is that Netflix sent out only the first six episodes for critical previews. Terrible move on their part. The show’s a pretty slow burn, but I feel like Netflix is really trusting that most of the audience will be binge-watching, which gives the series leeway for more consistent, deliberately-paced continuity than anything else in its class.
 The bread-crumbing approach is probably to blame for the mixed reception; only making it to episode 6 means you’re passing judgment before the show starts displaying its true colors. Bad for marketing, but it’s a really brilliant asset for the show in my eyes. The main character’s dysfunction seems like just a well for one-off gags in the first few episodes, but in simple terms, eventually shit gets real, and it’s very well-earned. The humor and the cultural commentary get sharper, the characterizations grow deeper, and I’m at the point where it’s all come to a really impressive head. Seeing how this arose from what appeared to be some pretty thinly-written opening episodes has been like watching a magic trick unfold; “Here I’m fiddling with some brightly-colored foam balls, oh what’s that? Oh look, I’m making that elephant levitate.” Imagine watching Kid Notorious for a few episodes, then discovering that you were actually watching Mad Men this whole time.If any of you were interested in it, but jumped ship after the few first episodes, at least get to the end of 11 before casting judgment; you owe it to yourself. Kudos to all of you who worked on the show so far. Here’s hoping it comes back and keeps on the upward trajectory.

I made this because I finished episode 11 of Bojack Horseman today, and it’s my fucking jam.

Seems like half of my friend circle worked on in some capacity, and I really need to give this show a recommendation; and not just because half of my friend circle worked on it (or because they deftly dropped a Death Grips track in one episode).

I really feel like the series hasn’t gotten a fair shake critically, with a pretty middling reception so far. Word is that Netflix sent out only the first six episodes for critical previews. Terrible move on their part. The show’s a pretty slow burn, but I feel like Netflix is really trusting that most of the audience will be binge-watching, which gives the series leeway for more consistent, deliberately-paced continuity than anything else in its class.

The bread-crumbing approach is probably to blame for the mixed reception; only making it to episode 6 means you’re passing judgment before the show starts displaying its true colors. Bad for marketing, but it’s a really brilliant asset for the show in my eyes. The main character’s dysfunction seems like just a well for one-off gags in the first few episodes, but in simple terms, eventually shit gets real, and it’s very well-earned. The humor and the cultural commentary get sharper, the characterizations grow deeper, and I’m at the point where it’s all come to a really impressive head.

Seeing how this arose from what appeared to be some pretty thinly-written opening episodes has been like watching a magic trick unfold; “Here I’m fiddling with some brightly-colored foam balls, oh what’s that? Oh look, I’m making that elephant levitate.” Imagine watching Kid Notorious for a few episodes, then discovering that you were actually watching Mad Men this whole time.

If any of you were interested in it, but jumped ship after the few first episodes, at least get to the end of 11 before casting judgment; you owe it to yourself. Kudos to all of you who worked on the show so far. Here’s hoping it comes back and keeps on the upward trajectory.

(Source: iamjayse)

THOSE ARE LITERALLY 1-LB DUMBBELLS. I AM SO ANGRY RIGHT NOW. DO YOU EVEN FUCKING LIFT, MINAJ?

THOSE ARE LITERALLY 1-LB DUMBBELLS. I AM SO ANGRY RIGHT NOW. DO YOU EVEN FUCKING LIFT, MINAJ?

(Source: glamvvhore)

Mozart wrote a canon called “Lick My Ass”. The lyrics were just “Lick my ass, fast” over and over.

Mozart wrote a canon called “Lick My Ass”. The lyrics were just “Lick my ass, fast” over and over.

(Source: konanyiffer420, via friendzonied)

lolfeedqc:

Not even my final form!

Oh, bother…

lolfeedqc:

Not even my final form!

Oh, bother…

(via morethantoomanyberks)

(Source: iguanamouth, via friendzonied)

(Source: ebilflindas)